Tech Career Advice Thread

Discussion in 'Tech Heads' started by Utumno, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leidos

    Leidos, formerly known as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC),[6] is an American defense, aviation, information technology, and biomedical research company headquartered in Reston, Virginia, that provides scientific, engineering, systems integration, and technical services. Leidos works extensively with the United States Department of Defense (4th largest DoD contractor FY2012), the United States Department of Homeland Security, and the United States Intelligence Community, including the NSA, as well as other U.S. government civil agencies and selected commercial markets.

    Leidos has four central divisions: Civil, Health, Advanced Solutions, and Defense & Intelligence. The Civil Division focuses on integrating aviation systems, securing transportation measures, modernizing IT infrastructure, and engineering energy efficiently. The Health Division focuses on optimizing medical enterprises, securing private medical data, and improving collection and data entry methods. The Advanced Solutions Division is centered around data analysis, integrating advanced defense and intelligence systems, and increasing surveillance and reconnaissance efficiency. The Defense & Intelligence Division focuses on providing air service solutions[clarification needed], geospatial analysis, cybersecurity, intelligence analysis, and supporting operations efforts.[7]

    On September 27, 2013, SAIC changed its name to Leidos and spun off a new and independent $4 billion government services and information technology company which retained the Science Applications International Corporation name; Leidos is the direct successor to the original SAIC.[2][3] Before the split, Leidos employed 39,600 employees and reported $11.17 billion in revenue and $525 million net income for its fiscal year ended January 31, 2013,[6] making it number 240[8] on the Fortune 500 list. In 2014, Leidos reported US$5.06 billion in revenue.[3]

    In August 2016, the deal to merge with the entirety of Lockheed Martin's Information Systems & Global Solutions (IS&GS) business came to a close, more than doubling the size of Leidos and its portfolio, and positioning the company as the global defense industry's largest enterprise in the federal technical solutions sector.[9] As of December 2017, the company has 32,000 employees.[1] In 2017, Leidos reported US$10.17 billion in revenue.

    The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) transitioned a Remote Viewing Program to SAIC in 1991 which was renamed Stargate Project.

    In March 2001 SAIC defined the concept for the NSA Trailblazer Project. In 2002, NSA contracted SAIC for $280 million to produce a "technology demonstration platform"[clarification needed] for the agency's project, a "Digital Network Intelligence" system to analyze data carried on computer networks. Other project participants included Boeing, Computer Sciences Corporation, and Booz Allen Hamilton.[31] According to science news site PhysOrg.com, Trailblazer was a continuation of the earlier ThinThread program.[32] In 2005, NSA director Michael Hayden told a Senate hearing that the Trailblazer program was several hundred million dollars over budget and years behind schedule.[33]

    In fiscal year 2003, SAIC did more than $2.6 billion in business with the United States Department of Defense, making it the ninth-largest defense contractor in the United States. Other large contracts included a bid for information technology for the 2004 Olympics in Greece[34]

    From 2001 to 2005, SAIC was the primary contractor for the FBI's unsuccessful Virtual Case File project.[35]
    During fiscal year 2012 (latest figure available), SAIC had more than doubled its business with the DoD to $5,988,489,000, and was the 4th-largest defense contractor on the annual list of the top 100.[36]
     
  2. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

    Post Count:
    21,998
    I love the fact we contract out work from the NSA, that's not fucking stupid or anything
     
  3. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

    Post Count:
    21,998
    After looking at that and the company information I wouldn't apply to that, that's very confusing on what they want or what the environment is even like.
     
  4. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    21,998
    So I went over to the SAP office to talk to the dev and support managers

    So being a consultant is way easier than being a dev/support
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2018
  5. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    someone show interesting stuff you can do in css
     
  6. Utumno

    Utumno Administrator Staff Member

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    I figured out some CSS one afternoon and thought it was cool but never used it again and now I don't know shit.

    Story of most technologies I try to learn these days.
     
  7. AgelessDrifter

    AgelessDrifter TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    I've dabbled with CSS when called for in the past and the shit that kills me is getting divs to line up properly and be the correct size, etc

    seems needlessly complicated

    why can't everything just be <table>s
     
  8. Jackpanel

    Jackpanel TZT Abuser

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    Just use Bootstrap for everything.
     
    Chemosh likes this.
  9. kamara veldereth

    kamara veldereth TZT Veteran

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    So true. Can be hard to get a foothold in consulting, and it's certainly not for everyone, but once you do and you become a SME in some niche then you're golden as long as you don't burn yourself out. I mostly enjoy what I do and get farmed out at $180-200/hr, see about half of that and company keeps the rest and I'm perfectly happy with that arrangement. You do need to have some plan to pivot to something else when/if what you're a SME in drastically changes or faces obsolescence (something I've been putting off for awhile and need to get more diligent about), but a good consulting company will help you cross that bridge if you've proven that you're a good consultant. If you do ever want to change jobs, you have opportunities with clients if you can get around whatever non-compete you signed, but from what I've seen consultants frequently go to clients despite breaking non-compete and nothing usually comes of it or there's some handshake deal behind the scenes. We lost a consultant recently to one of our larger clients and they are paying him almost $200k for a non-leadership role, but he is best of the best in what he does.
     
  10. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    I heard learning keyboard is important
     
    Czer likes this.
  11. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

    Post Count:
    21,998
  12. Utumno

    Utumno Administrator Staff Member

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    Although I'm not a fan of Edge, I actually think this is kindof a bad thing for the web in general. Almost everything is using chromium now (except for Firefox), and it's too easy to see html/web standards being completely owned by a single company in the future instead of being a real open standard.
     
  13. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    Being up to date in mouse is also pretty important
     
  14. Sear

    Sear TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    Yeah, this is popular and further reduces the amount of coding (using that term loosely) that has to be done, though you still have to understand html/css. There's no reason anyone who has even a passing interest in creating web content shouldn't take half a day to learn the basics. It's mandatory but such a short barrier to entry.

    There are also god knows how many template/CMS options available which reduce your workload even more. Example: http://themes.semicolonweb.com/html/canvas/index.html

    I think any idiot on this board could create a STUNNING PROFESSIONAL INTERNET SITE (WOW) after putting a few hours of their time in. I feel like templates are death to your own creativity, but they get the job done. Anything responsive with massive images (commonly used as background elements almost like wallpaper w/ a parallax scrolling effect) and the pre-canned jquery animations for calls to attention will dazzle the average dipshit who still thinks this is nuclear science.

    For the creative minds who are interested in what you can do with HTML5, I'd show them this: http://fff.cmiscm.com/
     
  15. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

    Post Count:
    21,998
  16. Jackpanel

    Jackpanel TZT Abuser

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    I was being semi-facetious. My background is as business software developer, meaning designing systems for data entry and reporting. Having a creative or complex UI barely registers as a requirement for those systems, so tools like Bootstrap or Telerik controls lets you focus on business logic instead of building UI. It looks very professional, is mobile friendly out of the box, and is easy to extend and enhance if you really want to customize the style.

    The team I manage now (20 devs) is split evenly between this kind of backend business developer and others dealing with our high profile, high traffic public site, where UI is everything and it has to be pixel perfect. The backend guys can use prebuilt stuff like Bootstrap and never need to know more than basic CSS, while the public site devs need to be extremely strong on CSS and JavaScript/typescript to do their job.

    To me, it’s always seemed like some sort of binary genetic trait of developers - they either love working on UI and tweaking CSS, or they hate it and love letting something like Bootstrap take away that burden.