Police Brutality, White Supremacy MEGATHREAD

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Vlaara, Jun 18, 2020.

  1. OrigZeatanas

    OrigZeatanas TZT Addict

    Post Count:
    4,195
    I've also thought about the same kinda things for political lawn signs. Like addendum ones you put next to the real one such as...

    [Trump 2020] [...because i hate brown people]
    | | | |

    [Cruz for Senate] [....hes not allowed to represent Cancun]
    | | | |
     
  2. AgelessDrifter

    AgelessDrifter TZT Neckbeard Lord

    Post Count:
    47,951
    Well, the GOP isn't, unfortunately:

    https://www.businessinsider.com/desantis-signs-law-to-punish-student-indoctrination-at-florida-universities-2021-6?

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signs a law punishing student 'indoctrination' at public universities and threatens budget cuts
    Eliza Relman
    5 hours ago

    [​IMG]
    Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida.
    Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
    • A new law in Florida requires public universities to survey students and staff about their beliefs.
    • The surveys purportedly seek to determine the state of "intellectual diversity" on campuses.
    • Gov. Ron DeSantis said campuses that are "hotbeds for stale ideology" were "not worth tax dollars."

    Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida on Tuesday signed legislation requiring the state's public colleges and universities to survey students, professors, and staff members about their political views in an effort to crack down on intellectual "indoctrination" on campuses.

    DeSantis, a potential 2024 presidential contender who's closely aligned with former President Donald Trump, threatened to cut funding from state universities that he determines don't promote "intellectual diversity."

    During a press conference at a middle school in Fort Myers, the governor said campuses that are "hotbeds for stale ideology" were "not worth tax dollars, and that's not something that we're going to be supporting going forward."

    The bill says the annual surveys would assess "intellectual freedom and viewpoint diversity" and determine "the extent to which competing ideas and perspectives are presented" and whether students, professors, and staffers "feel free to express their beliefs and viewpoints on campus and in the classroom."

    The law, effective July 1, demands that students "be shown diverse ideas and opinions, including those that they may disagree with or find uncomfortable," the state's Department of Education said.

    University professors and education experts in Florida have expressed concerns that the law would allow the state government to interfere with teaching; politicize faculty hiring, firing, and promotions; and stifle faculty and student speech.

    "I worry that this bill will force a fearful self-consciousness that is not as much about learning and debate as about appearances and playing into an outside audience," Cathy Boehme, a researcher at the Florida Education Association, told the Miami Herald in April.

    DeSantis said on Tuesday that he knew "a lot of parents" who were concerned that their kids would be "indoctrinated" in college."It used to be thought that a university campus was a place where you'd be exposed to a lot of different ideas," the governor said. "Unfortunately, now the norm is really these are more intellectually repressive environments. You have orthodoxies that are promoted, and other viewpoints are shunned or even suppressed."

    The law is part of a broader right-wing drive to push back on progressive influences in education. Republican lawmakers across the country have pushed to prohibit the teaching of The New York Times' 1619 Project, about the history of slavery, and of critical race theory, both of which have been banned in Florida's public schools.

    The governor signed two other education bills on Tuesday mandating new civics and "patriotism" education requirements in Florida's K-12 schools, including teaching about the "evils" of communist and totalitarian governments.

    Florida House Speaker Chris Sprowls, a Republican, said at the press conference that Florida's kids needed to be taught "about loving America" and "what our real history is and what our legacy is."

    ______________________________

    My alma mater will be shuttered in two weeks
     
  3. OrigZeatanas

    OrigZeatanas TZT Addict

    Post Count:
    4,195
    FUCK HIM, BULLET HEAD COLLISION COURSE
     
  4. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    [​IMG]

    "I've read Mao Zedong. I've read Karl Marx. I've read Lenin. That doesn't make me a communist. So what is wrong with understanding — having some situational understanding about the country for which we are here to defend?" Milley said.

    He continued brusquely: "And I personally find it offensive that we are accusing the United States military, our general officers, our commissioned, noncommissioned officers of being, quote, 'woke' or something else, because we're studying some theories that are out there."


    ...

    Gaetz wasn't the only member who asked about the military's approach to addressing race. Rep. Michael Waltz, R-Fla., cited a letter he received from West Point's superintendent, Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams, which states that one course at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point teaches about critical race theory (Waltz's office provided a copy of this letter to NPR). Waltz also referenced a seminar at West Point where an instructor reportedly taught about "understanding whiteness and white rage."

    In his response to Gaetz, Milley referenced Waltz's concerns as well, saying that such education could be useful in understanding the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6.

    "I want to understand white rage, and I'm white, and I want to understand it," he said. "So what is it that caused thousands of people to assault this building and try to overturn the Constitution of the United States of America? What caused that? I want to find that out."


    https://www.npr.org/2021/06/23/1009...osS8KO-l8gc64Hr5mdPyV_mwbU0UgtzjKSM42eGRIXM8c
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2021
    AgelessDrifter and Vlaara like this.
  5. Vlaara

    Vlaara Maaruk the Mighty

    Post Count:
    28,842
    when they cut to Gaetz stupid face I just wanted to punch that little weasel fuck
     
  6. OrigZeatanas

    OrigZeatanas TZT Addict

    Post Count:
    4,195
    go for it. apparently insurrection is only a $500 dollar fine if your white
     
  7. OrigZeatanas

    OrigZeatanas TZT Addict

    Post Count:
    4,195
  8. Vlaara

    Vlaara Maaruk the Mighty

    Post Count:
    28,842
    [​IMG]
     
    Utumno and Velox like this.
  9. Fais

    Fais TZT Abuser

    Post Count:
    9,369
  10. Kanmuk_Sealclubber

    Kanmuk_Sealclubber Yes

    Post Count:
    12,396
    Your murder rates are spiking just in time for the run-up to the 2022 midterms. The 2020 spike doesn’t seem to be letting up.

    The challenge in blaming the Pandemic, is that some other countries didn’t experience similar rises:
    https://torontosun.com/news/nationa...s-provincial-per-capita-homicide-rate-in-2020

    And you can look up some other countries to see small increases, or even decreases, in 2020.

    However, that doesn’t mean the Pandemic isn’t to blame. Gun ownership is up (like a whole lot). Young American men might not have adhered to lockdowns like in other countries (who might have seen rises in murder rates if people were out more), etc.

    The challenge with blaming de-fund is that murders are up in cities with Republican mayors and those that increased funding, as well, and crime, overall, mostly declined:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...e5aa46-d058-11eb-9b7e-e06f6cfdece8_story.html


    But, either way, this is a Democrat problem. Almost certainly policing is the easiest target, and they are now in the unenviable position of having to argue that it wasn’t the protests and de-fund movements that were responsible. I am very pro-BLM (although anti-defund) so not condemning the protests, but it’s now something the left has to deal with.
     
    Utumno likes this.
  11. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    saw an interestin' tweet thread from a criminologist on that recently

     
    Kanmuk_Sealclubber likes this.
  12. Kanmuk_Sealclubber

    Kanmuk_Sealclubber Yes

    Post Count:
    12,396
  13. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    the NYT article about gun buying accelerating early in the pandemic also seems pretty important, even though it's not a paper. i hadnt thought about it before seeing his tweets (despite remembering a bunch of tzt threads about exactly that increase in buying of guns, ammo etc), but i believe most guns used in crimes come from re-sales/thefts of guns that were originally sold legally in the 'primary' market, so it is in some sense not a huge surprise that a large increase in gun sales would lead to a large increase in violent crime, given how much easier it is to commit w/ a gun vs a knife vs a 2 by 4. maybe somewhat undercut by his pointing out that most guns of this kind tend to be older, and obviously the newly purchased ones wont have been around super long yet, but still seems worth looking into more
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2021
  14. Velox

    Velox TZT Abuser

    Post Count:
    8,791
    Why use a stolen gun rly, can't you just scrape off the serial number? It's premeditated either way. If it's just because "it's easier", I don't think violent crime is very elastic to changes in supply of stolen guns. Seems like more guns could lead to more spur of the moment gun violence though.
     
  15. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    the point isnt about stolen guns specifically, but about guns in violent crime, which enter through both theft and secondary market re-sales. probably secondary market re-sales are the larger of the two influences, but focusing on stolen ones vs them seems like it's trying very badly to miss the point

    unless you also think that violent crime isnt very elastic w.r.t. availability of guns for committing crimes, which would be more relevant
     
  16. Velox

    Velox TZT Abuser

    Post Count:
    8,791
    My point is, anybody can go out and buy a gun in the US if they take some time to prep for a crime. Secondary market supply won't affect premediated crimes much because they can just turn to the primary market.
     
  17. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    some relevant words

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_violence_in_the_United_States#Access_to_firearms

    i am personally fond of these kinds of quota laws, which seem like a no-brainer compromise between letting people have their fun and not letting them rapidly amass an arsenal to start a gang war:

    https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article236025568.html
     
  18. AgelessDrifter

    AgelessDrifter TZT Neckbeard Lord

    Post Count:
    47,951
    Plus who’s got money for a 2 by 4
     
    Red, Vlaara and Agrul like this.
  19. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Legend (seek help)

    Post Count:
    51,565
    i disagree

    presumably guns acquired directly from the primary market are easier to trace than guns that have been rotating informally between owners for many years

    & ease of access is important, especially if you're not talking about some isolated spurned wretch murdering his ex-wife, but are instead worried about widespread violence b/w gangs, ppl running meth labs in crumbling rural towns, etc. having a few somewhat trace-able expensive guns & having easy inexpensive hard-to-trace access to a large # of them are quite different situations
     
  20. Kanmuk_Sealclubber

    Kanmuk_Sealclubber Yes

    Post Count:
    12,396
    One of the challenges of gun control research is that it's very difficult to make an apples-to-apples comparison. For white men, who already own guns at a high rate, live in different neighbourhoods, or buy them for different reasons, laws may not have a huge impact.

    For black and hispanic populations, who own guns at a much lower rate than whites, but are statistically much more likely to kill someone else with a gun, laws that alter access to guns may have a bigger impact.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2017/06/22/the-demographics-of-gun-ownership/

    So the next question is, who is buying gun? It seems like the answer is "everyone". It also seems l ike the answer is "black people most of all":

    https://www.nssf.org/articles/nssf-...firearm-purchases-during-sales-surge-of-2020/

    I don't know if the age of guns matters if the most vulnerable populations have more access to guns, more situations escalate because of that, etc. It's hard to say.

    I think what we can do, however, is take this as more evidence to disabuse ourselves of the absurd notion that came up earlier in this thread (and other places) that, in order to keep their communities safe and guard against white oppression or racial violence, minority populations need to arm themselves.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2021