Fishing Megathread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Utumno, Jul 29, 2020 at 4:32 PM.

  1. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    ok so searyx is project lead on account of his enthusiasm congrats pal
     
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  2. Vlaara

    Vlaara Maaruk the Mighty

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    [​IMG]
    PHOTO © ROY CORRAL
     
  3. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    from your lack of reply i get the sense you're not interested or dont have time/energy for it, but tzt could probably give curricular direction pretty easily, and money isn't really needed; i own a lot of programming books but never look at any of them -- all the languages & help you need are freely available online. can't create time for you but those first two seem easy enough to fix

    a good start is something like:

    - probably start with a high-level language. python is especially beginner-friendly. C# in Unity is also OK if you want to learn while making games rather than more in the abstract on the command line
    - learn how to print shit to STDOUT. look up what STDOUT is. also learn how to do basic file operations (open/read/write/append from/to)
    - learn the basic data types available in whichever language you're using (e.g., float vs string vs bool vs lists vs tuples vs dicts etc in python), and understand how conversion between data types works in your language
    - learn basic control structures (if/then/else, while & for loops)
    - learn how to create functions + learn some basic uses for recursion
    - learn how to create classes + learn some basic uses for class inheritance
    - practice with some of the most common standard libraries/data structures made pre-available in your language of choice. e.g., it is good to have a sense of what is in python's math and collections libraries
    - learn how to use a few basic functional programming operators, especially map

    that's really all the foundational stuff, i think, and the functional one is optional rlly. with those basics, there are then lots of different things you can learn depending on what interests you

    - if you want to better understand how things work under the hood, learn some C++, to pick up some understanding of passing by value vs passing by reference, and how memory allocation/de-allocation & pointers work in languages that don't do garbage collection for you
    - learn how exceptions/raising of errors yourself works. really this is important enough that i'd almost call it foundational; it *is* foundational if you end up trying to get a job w/ other people and not just working on your own stuff
    - CSS and other gay internet stuff if you want to do gay web development
    - science & math stuff, focusing on the use of particular important libraries like numpy, if you want to do science & math stuff
    - learn some asynch / parallel programming examples in your language(s)
    - study whatever particular libraries & languages are used by software that interests you (e.g., Blender for 3D modeling uses python; Unity for games uses C#; Unreal Engine for games uses C++), looking up online what the major differences are b/w them and languages you're familiar w/, and googling examples of what you want to do in them to help you along
    - how to work (in a team or otherwise) w/ fancy version control software like git
    - etc etc
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020 at 4:56 PM
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  4. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    Have you tried not being poor? Or maybe don't spend extra money watching Star War at the drive in movie theater.
     
  5. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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  6. Sear

    Sear TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    Did Disney give up on making new Star War franchise films?

    Everything you posted here is legitimate, but it's a daunting wall of text that I'd be completely turned off by if I was new to the field.

    I found that I did better when I wasn't even specifically trying to learn. I started using photoshop because I wanted to make George Bush look like an idiot. Eventually I did get into more structured learning, but that wasn't how I got into it.

    My first thing in Unity/C# was to make a guy run and jump like Mario. In the process, I brushed up on a laundry list of OOP fundamentals, but it was really just "make guy run and jump". If I was Aro I'd start with a simple clear achievable goal that will be rewarding for him, like bringing one of his MSPaint classics to life. It'll snowball from there if you're having fun.
     
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  7. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    i think it'd be fine to instead learn mostly by trying to game jam little games together or something. i was just jotting down a sort of high-level "syllabus", since aro specifically mentioned not having "curricular direction"
     
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  8. Agrul

    Agrul TZT Neckbeard Lord

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    for doing it game-jam style, i think it might be easier for most absolute beginners to follow along with one of the step-by-step youtube tutorials for building a simple game as a first learning experience, rather than just jumping in and doing their own thing from the get-go
     
  9. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    The fans will never be happy with any new Star Wars movie and Disney also shit the bed hard with the new trilogy so they shelved it for now.
     
  10. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    I've said it once before but if you are reading this Disney please just make a 90 min movie with Big Vader going down a really long hallway
     
  11. Red

    Red TZT Neckbeard

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    30 mins in he takes a grazing blaster shot on his shoulder and he gets super pissed
     
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  12. Velox

    Velox TZT Abuser

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    There are plenty of online intro programming courses on e.g. Coursera, EdX also. The good ones should help you set everything up and shouldn't require much prior knowledge.

    As for languages, Python is a very popular language that is easy to get into. If you think you would enjoy making web sites/services, JavaScript is a no-brainer where you can see immediate results. You could build a career on either. Agrul's suggestion about C#+unity is a bit more difficult to start out with, but might be more fun if you enjoy game dev. I'm not sure how large the job market for that combo specifically is, but whatever gets the ball rolling. I would steer clear of the rest as a first language, unless you have some very specific interests.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020 at 6:35 PM
  13. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    A lot of people who even have a comfortable surface knowledge in computers don't understand what you guys are talking about software wise

    Like, explain in basic layman terms what different codes do and how markup language logic works etc, when you explain it as you describe the things to learn it helps to comprehend the parameters you're working within

    they are technically all programming languages but some are used for data sets like Agrul said

    a lot of code languages overlap in areas where one code language is superior etc
     
  14. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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  15. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    Difference Between Programming, Scripting, and Markup Languages
    26-08-2019

    https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/difference-between-programming-scripting-and-markup-languages/

    When it comes to making a website or app coding involves basically three types of languages i.e the programming language, Scripting Language and Markup Language.
    There are a lot of people who consider coding as just developing or making a website but they need to understand every single language fits into a particular category and we need to know which category that language fits into. We will discuss in detail about the difference between these three main categories or pillars of a website or an app i.e. Programming language, Scripting Language and Markup Language.

    Programming language: In simple terms, programming languages are set of instructions or code which tells a computer what it needs to do. So basically, we provide a logic or instruction to the computer to perform some task to get the desired output from it. When we need to write a CD or burn a CD or when we need to paste something in pen drive these all instruction is given through some software which involves some instructions or set of code and this software communicate to the hardware. Programming languages are high-level languages that need to be converted into machine level language because a computer can only understand machine level language or binary language (0 and 1). So we write the instructions in human-readable form and then we hit the compile button to convert this into machine level language which a computer can understand and then the computer performs the task. This conversion is done by the compiler which scans the complete code in one go and if it finds any error it immediately throws all errors. Examples are Java, C, C++, C#. Programming languages are most widely used to make software or drivers.

    Scripting Language: As the name suggest, it’s all about giving the script to perform some certain task. Scripting languages are basically the subcategory of programming languages which is used to give guidance to another program or we can say to control another program, so it also involves instructions. It basically connects one language to one another languages and doesn’t work standalone. Javascript, PHP, Perl, Python, VBScript these all are the examples of scripting language. Scripting languages need to be interpreted (Scanning the code line by line, not like compiler in one go) instead of compiled. There is no scope of compiler in scripting languages. Scripting languages are most widely used to create a website.

    Markup Languages: Markup languages are completely different from programming languages and scripting languages. Markup languages prepare a structure for the data or prepare the look or design of a page. These are presentational languages and it doesn’t include any kind of logic or algorithm, for example, HTML. HTML is not asking any kind of question to the computer or it’s not comparing things and it’s not asking any logical question. It’s just used to represent a view inside a web browser. It tells the browser how to structure data for a specific page, layout, headings, title, table and all or styling a page in a particular way. So basically it involves formatting data or it controls the presentation of data. Examples of Markup languages are HTML, CSS or XML. These languages are most widely used to design a website.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_code

    In computer programming, machine code, consisting of machine language instructions, is a low-level programming language used to directly control a computer's central processing unit (CPU). Each instruction causes the CPU to perform a very specific task, such as a load, a store, a jump, or an arithmetic logic unit (ALU) operation on one or more units of data in the CPU's registers or memory.

    Machine code is a strictly numerical language which is intended to run as fast as possible, and may be regarded as the lowest-level representation of a compiled or assembled computer program or as a primitive and hardware-dependent programming language. While it is possible to write programs directly in machine code, managing individual bits and calculating numerical addresses and constants manually is tedious and error-prone. For this reason, programs are very rarely written directly in machine code in modern contexts, but may be done for low level debugging, program patching (especially when assembler source is not available) and assembly language disassembly.

    The overwhelming majority of practical programs today are written in higher-level languages or assembly language. The source code is then translated to executable machine code by utilities such as compilers, assemblers, and linkers, with the important exception of interpreted programs,[1] which are not translated into machine code. However, the interpreter itself, which may be seen as an executor or processor performing the instructions of the source code, typically consists of directly executable machine code (generated from assembly or high-level language source code).

    Machine code is by definition the lowest level of programming detail visible to the programmer, but internally many processors use microcode or optimise and transform machine code instructions into sequences of micro-ops. This is not generally considered to be a machine code.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_language

    In computer programming, assembly language (or assembler language),[1] often abbreviated asm, is any low-level programming language in which there is a very strong correspondence between the instructions in the language and the architecture's machine code instructions.[2] Because assembly depends on the machine code instructions, every assembler has its own assembly language which is designed for exactly one specific computer architecture. Assembly language may also be called symbolic machine code.[3][4]

    Assembly code is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler. The conversion process is referred to as assembly, as in assembling the source code. Assembly language usually has one statement per machine instruction (1:1), but comments and statements that are assembler directives,[5] macros,[6][1] and symbolic labels of program and memory locations are often also supported.

    The term "assembler" is generally attributed to Wilkes, Wheeler and Gill in their 1951 book The preparation of programs for an electronic digital computer,[7] who, however, used the term to mean "a program that assembles another program consisting of several sections into a single program".[8]

    Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture and sometimes to an operating system.[9] However, some assembly languages do not provide specific syntax for operating system calls, and most assembly languages can be used universally with any operating system, as the language provides access to all the real capabilities of the processor, upon which all system call mechanisms ultimately rest. In contrast to assembly languages, most high-level programming languages are generally portable across multiple architectures but require interpreting or compiling, a much more complicated task than assembling.

    The computational step when an assembler is processing a program is called assembly time.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020 at 6:40 PM
  16. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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  17. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    https://www.educba.com/assembly-language-vs-machine-language/

    Difference Between Assembly Language and Machine Language

    In this article, we will discuss in detail about assembly language vs machine language. Machine language is a language that has a binary form. It can be directly executed by a computer. While an assembly language is a low-level programming language that requires software called an assembler to convert it into machine code.

    The programming language is a set of instructions, in order to make a computer understand to perform a specific task or create an algorithm. There is huge variety of programming languages available nowadays like C, C++, COBOL, Java, Python, Fortran, Ada, and Pascal.

    All programming language has some primitive building blocks which are known as syntax. These syntaxes of languages are textual. Primitives are combined by programmers to compose new programs.

    Programming language broadly categorized into 3 categories:
    1. High-level programming language
    2. Assembly language
    3. Machine Language
    A high-level language is easy for programmers to write as well as to understand. Programmers here use simple and easy syntax to address a specific task. Examples: Python, C, C++, etc. These syntaxes can’t be understood by CPU; hence it gets converted internally to binary which CPU can understand by the medium of compiler and interpreter.

    Assembly language falls between a high-level programming language and Machine language. it has syntaxes similar to English, but more difficult than high-level programming languages. To program in assembly language, one should have understood at hardware level like computer architecture, registers, etc. This kind of programming is mostly seen in the embedded systems.

    An example is given below,

    ADD R1, R2

    [​IMG]

    Machine language is the binary language that is easily understood by computers. Hence it can be directly executed by CPU with absolutely no need of compilers and interpreters.

    [​IMG]

    The figure shown above represents machine language, assembly language and high-level language is clear form.

    For e.g:001010001110

    Represents a 12-bit machine language instruction. This instruction is divided into two parts: An operation code (or op code) and an operand.

    Op code is 001, Operand is 010001110.

    Along with remembering the dozens of code numbers for the operations, the programmer also has to keep track of the addresses for all the data items. Hence, Machine language is considered challenging and error-prone.

    Head to Head Comparison between Assembly Language and Machine Language (Infographics)

    Below is the top 7 difference between Assembly Language vs Machine Language.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

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    You can actually get games to learn the concepts of this
     
  19. Czer

    Czer I'm a poor person. The lambo is my cousin's.

    Post Count:
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  20. Velox

    Velox TZT Abuser

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    Simple academic explanation:
    All of those languages mentioned are known as formal languages (=computer interpretable, has precise structure/syntax). If a language can make the computer do arbitrary calculations & logic, it's usually called a programming language. Some, like HTML, can only do specialized stuff (like show text in a browser), so are formal languages, but not what people call programming languages.

    However, a computer only speaks in the assembly language (can be considered machine code), so is hard to work in for humans. This is why people have invented other human-friendly languages, who run on top of it. To make a computer do anything in any other such programming language, it of course needs to be automatically translated to assembly behind the curtains. They do this in several ways, but all of them are arguably programming languages.

    Technical explanation: Early programming languages were translated in advance to assembly (C/C++), known as compiling the program. Scripting (interpreted) languages instead do the compilation line-by-line as it runs in an interpreter program. It basically takes the line and looks up the corresponding assembly. This requires no compilation step, but the interpreter makes it run slower.

    The delineation between scripting languages and compiled languages is kind of blurred these days, many like Java/C# run in a virtual machine (fancy interpreter) and use a two-step process. They often compile to an assembly-like intermediary language in advance ("byte code"), which is then interpreted and more easily translated to assembly when you run it. They can also use tricks like compiling parts of the program in advance, and reuse already compiled code. A big advantage of virtual machines is that they can catch errors before they cause your program/computer to crash or wipe your disk. They are much faster than directly interpreted languages, but are slightly slower than directly compiled languages. This basically sums up C# vs. C++. Many languages like Python and JavaScript started out directly interpreted, but have moved more towards the virtual machine approach.

    Even if you can make arbitrary calculations in any decent programming language, they were all designed to be good at and easy to use for some kind of task. JavaScript was made to run in a virtual machine inside your browser, to give web sites some capability to run programs and not just show text via HTML. It was therefore designed so that it is easy to interact with HTML and websites. This is really cumbersome in e.g. C/C++, which was made for performance and interacting directly with hardware. Python was made to be an easy-to-use general-purpose language.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020 at 4:08 AM